Chameleon Dress

DATE – 2012
DISCIPLINE – Art
MEDIUM – Interactive LED fabric done in collaboration with fashion designer Anouk Wipprecht
STATUS – Exhibited at Technosensual in Vienna, Austria
WEBLINKS
https://www.cnet.com/pictures/technosensual-crazy-catwalk-of-future-fashion-pictures/12/
http://v2.nl/events/technosensual
http://www.q21.at/en/artists-in-residence/artists/artistinfo/graham-smith-1/
http://www.q21.at/artists-in-residence/artists/artistinfo/graham-smith/

The “Chameleon Dress” is a joint project by Graham Smith and Anouk Wipprecht and is an interactive fashion initiative to create a new form of wearable clothing that changes color in relation to the environment it is placed in. The “Chameleon Coat” utilizes advanced LED, camera and fiber optic technologies in new ways that combine together to redefine how fabric interacts with its surroundings. The first version of the Chameleon Dress will utilize a live camera and miniature battery powered LED beamer connected to a bundle of 300 fiber optic cables which will transmit the color sensation of the environment to the fabric. The effect will mimic the way a real Cameleon reacts to its environment and will redefine the concept of what color something is by always changing and altering depending on where it is placed.

Displaced Perspectives 2.0

DATE – 2011
DISCIPLINE – Art
MEDIUM
STATUS
WEBLINKS
http://interaccess.org/exhibition/strategic-arts-initiative-20
http://v2.nl/archive/works/displaced-perspectives
http://1995-2015.undo.net/it/evento/128342

A project done for the 100th anniversary of McLuhan’s birth in collaboration with V2 in Rotterdam and the McLuhan Program in Culture and Technology at the University of Toronto for the “Strategic Arts Initiative 2.0” exhibition which used 2 robots with cameras v to link Rotterdam to Toronto. The group exhibition included works by Doug Back, Carl Hamfelt, Laura Kikauka, Graham Smith, David Rokeby and Norman White. The “Strategic Arts Initiative 2.0” exhibition was funded through a Media Arts grant from the Canada Council of the Arts.


https://vimeo.com/44733804

The Third Eye

DATE – 2010
DISCIPLINE – Art
MEDIUM – Telepresence robotics and installation art
STATUS – Exhibited in Nov-Dec 2010
WEBLINKS

http://www.cybercityruhr.com
http://www.cybercityruhr.com/the-third-eye-eng.htm

THE THIRD EYE – International Project for the European Capital of Culture Ruhr.2010
THE THIRD EYE is a 4-year interdisciplinary art project for the European Capital of Culture Ruhr.2010. “What is a city, how do I live?” and “What could a city be?” – in interaction with science, education and art, these main questions will be examined to create visions for the metropolises of the future. Scientists, pupils, students, artists, architects, urban planners and designers from different parts of Europe construct miniature-models of their future metropolises in a process that include the central themes Urbanism, Identity and Integration, such as CYBERCITY Ruhrstadt (GER), Randstadt (NL) or Tallinn (EST). When constructing the models, pupils from different cities combine place and buildings from their actual living environment with elements which they miss in their city and which they wish to have for themselves in the future. Visions for new cities and metropolises emerge from the future cities of the children and teenagers and the ideas of the artists, architects, urban planners and designers, made comprehensible within the models. These impulses for future European metropolises will be presented in a central interactive, multi-media based exhibition. In the exhibition the viewer roams around the models with the help of the remote controlled video robot – which serve as “avatars” – and “dives” virtually into the model worlds to explore them from the perspective of a pedestrian. People can visit the exhibition on site and via internet from all over the world.



Intersection

DATE – 2010
DISCIPLINE – Art
MEDIUM – Interactive video installation
STATUS – Displayed at Transmediale in Berlin, Germany
WEBLINKS
https://transmediale.de/de/vernissage-intersection-graham-smith
https://transmediale.de/de/content/graham-smith
Intersection

INTERSECTION is a work exploring the history of the Berlin Wall and is comprised of an interactive video installation that morphs between a set of a panoramic murals shot at the same Berlin Wall site between the years 1988 to 2009. The 3.6 meter high by 15 meter long piece uses beamers, cameras and computer software to track the location of people in front of the piece which is designed to convey a rich, complex impression of the enormous physical and geopolitical transformations the area around the wall has under gone over the last 20 years by allowing people the ability to literally “walk in and out of time”. By giving viewers the ability to explore history with their bodies as well as their eyes the piece aims to create an image that becomes alive, reacting to the movement of the viewers to project a sense of the multifaceted history the area holds. The Intersection exhibition was funded through a Media Arts grant from the Canada Council of the Arts.

MOBI Jr

DATE – 2007
DISCIPLINE – Art
MEDIUM – Interactive robotic sculpture
STATUS – Displayed at the Ontario Science Centre, Toronto, Canada
WEBLINKS

http://gaggio.blogspirit.com/archive/2007/04/11/mobi.html

MOBI (Mobile Operating Bi-directional Interface), by Graham Smith, is a human sized telepresence robot that users remotely control to move through distant environments, see through its camera eye, talk through its speakers and hear via its microphone ear. Simultaneously a life sized image of themselves is projected onto the robots LCD face, creating a robotic avatar. MOBI allows people to “explore far away art shows, attend distant presentations and make public appearances from anywhere on earth, thus helping to reduce air travel and reduce global warming”. MOBI is at DEAF 07


Morphing Machinery

DATE – 2007
DISCIPLINE – Art
MEDIUM – Telepresence robotic installation
STATUS – Displayed at DEAF 2007 in Rotterdam, Netherlands

As science shrinks machines to ever smaller dimensions and the evolution of nanotechnology becomes more refined our human perception of what a machine is will change radically. Due to the unique ability of nanotechnology to restructure itself on a microscopic level, we may find that our mechanical and architectural creations begin to resemble the organic more than the mechanic. Just as plants grow and alter there structures over time our machines, buildings and environments may in the future reconfigure themselves based on environmental and programming influences. Our cities will then become alive in a real sense as they will change and evolve in ways that more resemble the growth in a forest. This new urban landscape, filled with transforming machines and architectural forms in motion, is the thematic foundation of the MORPHING MACHINERY exhibition.

CYBERCITY RUHR
Anja Bardey
Christina Smith
Graham Smith

INSTRUCTORS
Rob Dielissen
Robbert Smit
Graham Smith

WDKA STUDENTS
Joost Bakkes
Michael Baks
Rick van den Berg
Suzan Dahmen
Noel Deelen
Elisabeth van Dijke
Mathijs van Geest
Teun de Graaf
Annemarie Hooghuis
Tarek Khalel
Dico Kruijsse
Sandy Mendes
Jero van Niewkoop
Erik Overmeire
Sander van der Pol
Afshin Shahidi
Dander Struik
Martine Taks
Hiko Uenura
Quin de vreede
Mariska Vogel
Lee Wessels
Kris van der Werve
Weronika Zielinski

MOBI (Mobile Operating Bi-directional Interface)

DATE – 2006
DISCIPLINE – Art
MEDIUM – – Interactive robotic sculpture
STATUS
WEBLINKS

http://v2.nl/archive/works/mobi/?searchterm=MOBI
http://archive.turbulence.org/blog/archives/004086.html
http://gaggio.blogspirit.com/tag/artificial+intelligence

MOBI (Mobile Operating Bi-directional Interface), by Graham Smith, is a human sized telepresence robot that users remotely control to move through distant environments, see through its camera eye, talk through its speakers and hear via its microphone ear. Simultaneously a life sized image of themselves is projected onto the robots LCD face, creating a robotic avatar. MOBI allows people to “explore far away art shows, attend distant presentations and make public appearences from anywhere on earth, thus helping to reduce air travel and reduce global warming”. MOBI is at DEAF 07.

MOBI is a human sized telepresence robot that users remotely control to move through distant environments, see through its camera eye, talk through its speakers and hear via its microphone ear. Simultaneously a life sized image of themselves is projected onto the robots LCD face, creating a robotic avatar. MOBI allows people to “explore far away art shows, attend distant presentations and make public appearences from anywhere on earth, thus helping to reduce air travel and reduce global warming”.

MOBIs are mobile robots that can look, listen and speak, that is, when controlled by a user who is located elsewhere. MOBI stands for Mobile Operating Bidirectional Interface. Each MOBI is equipped with a camera, speakers and a microphone and allows the user to create a presence in another place. MOBIs are made by the Canadian artist Graham Smith, who has been conducting artistic research into telepresence since 1993. Of course we have long been able to make our presence felt in other places, in real time, even, ever since the invention of the telephone. Webcams are an everyday phenomenon, and lectures held via videoconferencing do not surprise us. But telephones, webcams and videoconferencing do not create a bodily presence in another space. MOBIs, meanwhile, enable tangible physical presence elsewhere. You can use a MOBI to visit the DEAF exhibition without getting out of your chair, and even to talk to other visitors. (Interacting with the art, though, will be a problem — for one thing, MOBIs lack flexible arms or fingers). MOBIs have a theatrical aspect in that the user becomes a performer before an audience of exhibition visitors.

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